Bob Loblaw's Law Blog.

Hello there.
It's nice to see you found my page.
Just finished college and trying to find someone who will pay me.
I'm obsessed with history, politics, and space.
I focus on the Middle East but study Russia/Eastern Europe for fun.
I believe in the subjunctive and the Oxford comma, long may they reign.
كنت وما زلت دراسة العربية واريد ان امرس دائمن
~ Wednesday, October 1 ~
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benepla:

WHY YOU SHOULD GO WATCH WADJDA RIGHT NOW IMMIDIETLY
takes place in saudi arabia
all characters muslim
really, really well written. it’s essentially a slice-of-life comedy about a 10-year-old-girl trying to save up enough money to buy a bike, and the roadblocks she hits while doing so.
all the characters, most of which are women, are fleshed-out, enjoyable, and given their own seperate character arc. every single arc just hits it right on the head. it’s basically a cast of well-written, well-acted muslim characters.
first saudi arabian feature film to be directed by a woman
it’s funny. like, really fucking funny.
oh my god.
go watch wadjda.
here
here i even have a link you can watch it right now
there is literally no reason to watch this perfect fucking film right now
if you like well written comedies with a mostly-female, all-muslim, all person-of-color cast, just watch this ok
i’M NOT K IDDING SOMEONE WATCH WADJDA SO THEY CAN TALK ABOUT IT WITH ME

NO BUT ACTUALLY THIS IS ONE OF THE BEST MOVIES EVER PLZ WATCH.

benepla:

WHY YOU SHOULD GO WATCH WADJDA RIGHT NOW IMMIDIETLY

NO BUT ACTUALLY THIS IS ONE OF THE BEST MOVIES EVER PLZ WATCH.


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discoverynews:

Lakes Around the World Are Rapidly Disappearing
A few days ago, NASA posted startling satellite pictures of the Aral Sea in Central Asia, once the fourth biggest lake on the planet, which over the past 50 years has been virtually drained as a result of an ill-advised Soviet-era effort to create farms in the desert.

discoverynews:

Lakes Around the World Are Rapidly Disappearing

A few days ago, NASA posted startling satellite pictures of the Aral Sea in Central Asia, once the fourth biggest lake on the planet, which over the past 50 years has been virtually drained as a result of an ill-advised Soviet-era effort to create farms in the desert.


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iwriteaboutfeminism:

#BlackLiberation #Ferguson


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vacilandoelmundo:

Time Slice by Richard Silver

The idea behind the “Time Sliced” Project was to photograph iconic world buildings at sunset and capture the changing light from day to night in a single image. Experimenting with a few different kinds of processes I came up with the “Sliced” idea. I decided to Slice time and light showing the progression of the day from left to right.


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senoritakos:

kingcheddarxvii:

Not the heroes we thought we needed but the heroes we really needed all along

LOL!

senoritakos:

kingcheddarxvii:

Not the heroes we thought we needed but the heroes we really needed all along

LOL!

(Source: shopjeen)


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~ Monday, September 29 ~
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While there is a lot of appropriate rage about Ferguson right now, the killing of John Crawford, III is getting less attention than it deserves. I put Shaun King’s tweets and history lesson on the matter in chronological order for easier consumption.

Links:

Autopsy and video show John Crawford shot from behind in Wal-Mart

Witness in murder of John Crawford changes story

You really should be following Shaun King on Twitter.

(Source: poldberg)


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bottomjared:

im dead

bottomjared:

im dead


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(Source: sandandglass)


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gentle-payne:

Hey so recently the protests in Hong Kong have reached the eyes and ears of an international audience and I realize that people are reblogging these images of the various states of the protests and the interactions with the police including tear gas, pepper spray and excessive force. I also realize that most people don’t know what exactly is going on or only know vague facts and even though I no longer live there this hits very close to home and I want people to fully understand what is going on. So here’s a run down:

- Hong Kong was a colony of England until 1997 when it was turned over to China. The agreement was that Hong Kong would be allowed to hold their own democratic elections for the first time ever in 2017 to appoint their leader known as the Hong Kong Chief Executive. Currently, that position is filled by someone chosen by a Chinese commitee.  The system that would be put into place in 2017 is “one country two systems”. 

- In July 2014 specifically the Chinese government released a statement basically saying that Hong Kong citizens could vote democratically, but the only candidates that could run would be picked specifically by the Chinese government. China would literally pick who would be Chief Executive allowing for China to implement their own rules through the Chief Exec. on Hong Kong. 

- Benny Tai is the founder and head of Occupy Central a non-violent protest for universal suffrage (basically the right to vote) started in early 2013. Since the Chinese government revealed this set up more people have continued to join the protests which have escalated this past weekend. Just a reminder these were all peaceful protests in which the police responded starting with pepper spray and moving up to tear gas and rubber bullets extremely fast. 

- The importance of these protests though is not specifically the election in 2017 it’s whether Hong Kong will accept China’s slow invasion of Hong Kongers rights or not.  Hong Kong inhabitants throughout the years have been growingly nervous at the thought of a Chinese takeover specifically of another occurrence of Tiananmen Square where about 2.5 thousand peaceful protesters were massacred. Although Hong Kong was not directly targeted the thought that this could happen again in Hong Kong this time is increasingly worry some especially now with the crackdown on the protests.

Honestly the scariest part of this all is that Hong Kong is an international affluent city home to approximately 7.5 million people and one of the most important financial capitals of the world. This is not a small village or town that will be over run, it is a well oiled modern city that prides itself in being insanely efficient and a predominately safe atmosphere. Being a teenager there especially on Hong Kong Island was extremely easy as the number and seriousness of crimes were a bare minimum. Of course there are areas that you wouldn’t want to be walking alone around at night but what I’m trying to get at is this is not a city where excessive violence generally occurs.  So the fact that the police are the ones cracking down and there is fear and anxiety over the future of a democratic Hong Kong is genuinely terrifying.

I really hope you understand the importance of these protests and the impact they will have on the future of Hong Kong.  

Some sources that are offering live coverage:

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x

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Note: The last image of the peace sign + umbrella is said to be the slogan for the protests due to the use of umbrellas during the protests to block pepper spray, direct contact to tear gas and for general protection against anything thrown at them. You will notice many people holding them open in the above photos


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Anonymous said: In all honesty, I'm quite confused by the communism in China... did it really ruin China? Some actually disagree with this notion claiming that if it wasn't for communism, China would still be poor and won't be as prosperous as it is now. Yes, the government is corrupt but what government isn't? At least they contribute to the country's development unlike with other countries where almost all their officials are thieves milking its country for profit.

stirringwind:

…I can tell you it most definitely did ruin China. More people died in the Great Chinese Famine caused by disastrous Communist agricultural policies than under the Japanese imperialism during World War 2. The China you see today is where it is PRECISELY because the less ideological Party members like Deng Xiaoping realised economic Communism couldn’t work and basically tossed it out to embrace the free market. China would have been SO MUCH better without the horrible upheaval in the 1950s-1970s where MILLIONS died due to political witch hunts or famines under Mao’s reign. Deng himself and other more pragmatic members of the Communist party were jailed or accused of being “bourgeois”. He fortunately managed to win a power struggle in the 1970s, and so his reform of China prevailed. 

Yes, capitalism in China has problems but compared to the extreme poverty, food shortages and illiteracy by the end of Mao’s disastrous reign, Chinese people have had their standard of living improved precisely because they stopped adhering to Communism economically. China in the 1960s in the midst of all that chaos was akin to North Korea during its own 1990s famine. China, the world’s second largest economy, the emerging superpower today- is where it is PRECISELY because it abandoned Communism economically. Economically, its form of capitalism is still more imperfect as it’s not fully balanced with socialist principles like worker’s rights, pensions, government regulations as it is in developed countries. As it is, the authoritarianism of its government is also still limiting China’s potential. A lot of Chinese environmentalists, for example, have been jailed and harassed by officials for trying to raise awareness about pollution, which is a serious problem there.

And…uh the thing is a lot of Chinese officials are indeed still thieves milking the country for profit. There’s been a lot of slavish praising of the “Chinese system” by Western economists, which is what may have affected your perceptions. And I roll my eyes whenever I read some Western economist gushing about it. Why? Because they’re so privileged that they don’t see the human cost this is exerting on China. Compared to the US, China has severely damaged its environment in many places. You should see the smog readings in Beijing. Or the lack of worker’s rights and protections in factories where people have to sort poisonous electronic waste with their BARE HANDS. The US government is frustrating, yes, but that is usually much less compared to what Chinese citizens have to deal with. You guys in the so-called “ageing, less dynamic Western countries” are seriously DEFINITELY better off. The Yangtze river, for example, has become so polluted by MNCs because provincial officials don’t care as they only care about the money and promotions it’ll bring them. A lot of netizens have been using the Internet to expose the corruption of officials. This kind of economic growth is not going to be sustainable.

A lot of those Western economists praising China’s system do it totally blind to the fact that it comes at the cost of a lot of Chinese people themselves. And it’s the legacy of Communism- that China is still politically authoritarian that is causing this. Because as imperfect as democracy is, you have power. You have the power to at least elect people who represent your interests and fight for your rights. Your government wouldn’t be able to completely ignore you.

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My great grandparents were from China. When I post all of these, it’s not to say China is totally bad and the West is good in a condescending way. I recognise the Opium Wars was British imperialism that really exploited China. But the Communist Party has to own what happened after WW2. This is a country with enormous potential, but it is undeniable it has A LOT of problems hindering that. The way China’s economy grew in the last 30 years was at breakneck speed. Imagine US economic growth from 1850 till 2000 condensed into 30 years. That’s basically what happened- going from a primary rural, agrarian country to an industrial one where the majority of people live in cities. Imagine America in the 1920s with Prohibition, gangs, crime. That’s similar to many parts of China nowadays. Because that kind of rapid growth brings with it severe socio-economic dislocations that is responsible for all of these problems. An authoritarian system without a built-in feedback loop of a free press and democracy only worsens these problems.

Hong Kong isn’t mainland China, but IMO all this unrest whether by Hong Kongers and mainland Chinese is a product of the same disease- an authoritarian system that lacks accountability. The continued authoritarianism of the government leads to outbursts of unrests because things never get addressed, or they try to suppress political opinions instead of actual dealing with their grievances. 


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